New Dental Materials Resists Plaque, Kills Microbes

Biofilms composed of Streptococcus mutans were much easier to remove when grown on a newly developed dental material (right image), which has an antimicrobial agent within it, compared to a control material. Image by University of Pennsylvania.

According to researchers from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, a new dental material tethered with an antimicrobial compound has been shown not only to resist plaque but also to kill the bacteria that cause it. This is welcome news to oral health professionals, who rely on dental materials, such as composite, to perform necessary restorative procedures.

According to the study, this new dental material has demonstrated the ability to resist plaque and kill bacteria with minimal toxicity in the oral environment. Its effectiveness is thanks to a low dose of the antibacterial agent imidazolium, which kills bacteria only upon contact. Furthermore, researchers were encouraged by the outstanding mechanical properties of the material, which is an important characteristic when selecting a restorative material.

The complete study was published in the journal ACS Applied Materials and Interfaces. The research was conducted thanks to funding from Dentsply Sirona.

From MENTOR. February 2018;9(2): 11.

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